Friday, 30 October 2015

Hey...I'm pregnant!

Well now, it has been a long while eh? I made a decision to update the blog and get on top of it 8 and a bit months ago... and then...well, I got pregnant!
I figure I better tell you now before I just appear with a baby.

We are delighted, of course, especially after quite a long time of trying and one miscarriage. We know it is a girl and the pregnancy has gone very well. As well pregnancies go that is... with morning sickness, not sleeping (what is that about?), sore hips and endless peeing.

At Three + months in an old sample twizzle dress, rocket original shoes, Henry the cat
One neat thing about being pregnant is that some of your friends who are a bit behind you, find you safe to confide in to speak about their early pregnancy concerns, or sadly, their fertility problems. It is a dear privilege to be the one they feel they can chat to. I've been pretty open about our struggles, so that helps others to open up too. So, first off, I'm sending very big hugs to all those struggling with family issues. It's tough. You'll be ok no matter what.

I've also fielded quite a few questions about vintage maternity wear. What a minefield! I hope to give you a bit of a mini series of how I have managed my wardrobe.

There are very few real bits of maternity about. It would have simply been worn out lots, over many pregnancies then handed on and worn out more, until someone was so sick of the sight of it she cut out a babies outfit from the fabric!

You have even less choice if you already have a big bust like me or have even moderately sized biceps. Maternity patterns aren't much better and mostly come in pee-wee sizes. People married younger, got cracking with a family straight off and so were smaller perhaps. I soon realised that I could waste a lot of time fruitlessly looking for vintage, and frankly, there were too many other things taking up my energy.

At Hep Cats Holiday July around five + months, still in a Fleur dress
Instead I did quite well in the first 6 months with clothes that were just a bit more spacious, and with items from Heyday - the stretch Twizzle dress and the wrap Fleur, both in a larger size than normal.

The Judy dress was also surprisingly good in a larger size. because it doesn't have a zip, it is a bit more forgiving at the waist so you can get in it, then you can snitch it in as needed with the belt. I could have gone longer in the Judy dress but in the end I was popping out of it at the bustline more than the bumpline! The boobs kept pace with the bump until about 7 months so I really felt like I just looked fatter and fatter rather than pregnant!

Hep Cats Holiday July.  Five + months
I would really advise mums-to-be to not get too hung up on being 100% vintage. People will forgive you if you adopt other clothing and in fact, you might as well have fun with it. I danced the night away in this number for a Hawaiian theme. The bodice is all elasticated and I'd normally reserve it for summer holidays. What is great about it, is that the shirring elastic brings it in just under the bust. This is essential for making your maternity wear more shapely as your ribs become your smallest part. But warning - this is NOT very vintage! I just felt happier in something with more shape.

You can also browse high street shops for empire line dresses that flare out at the bump line. They don't have to be maternity, as it is in fashion anyway. These dresses don't suit me when I'm un-pregnant, so in a way it was fun to shop for something different, and even browse the high street for a change!

Monsoon Dress - Modern, Seven months
Hide your bump by standing front on!
These last photos were taken with many demands by Mr Heyday saying "chin down" "chin out" and so forth. He's learnt what I don't like! So here is one final gurning pic of me deliberately over-doing it. Ha ha!


I'll be back shortly with more real vintage maternity wear - just gotta find the pics!

Sx





Thursday, 19 February 2015

Fantasy Packing for THE fabulous Art Deco Weekend

It is that time of year when here in the UK we are fervently looking for signs of spring ("Come ON daffodils")... meanwhile, over in my homeland of NZ, the vintage community are sewing, packing and pressing to get themselves off to the Art Deco weekend in Napier.

This is the time of year when I wish I was at home. I've only been once to "Art Deco" as it is known. (I find it kind of neat to call it that, like it is both a place and a era of style. It's quite fitting since one does feel like a time traveller to go there). The last time I was there for the event was before we moved to the UK, and before I had a digital camera!

More recently  my Niece got married there. So here's a pic of my sister-in-law Ness and I doing the quintessential pose in the fountain.



The event is quite hard to dress for, especially if you want to be authentic. It is very very hot, there is lots of walking to do, there are LOTS of events to go to, some of which require different outfits, and of course you are dancing and sitting on the lawn. Not many of those things sit well with original vintage or being glamorous and comfy at the same time. You also really do need a sun hat if you want to get through the day without a headache from the heat and squinting. (I remember one friend packed 24 hats one year!)

So, what would be my fantasy Art Deco wardrobe? If I was going?

It would all be about BEACH PYJAMAS, big hats and a cover up for my shoulders


I like the idea of a long lightweight shawl that I can throw on when I need to hide from the sun, and a blouse would also do the trick, worn as a jacket

A strappy, nautical themed dress with a matching cover up
Patron Journal, May 1938


Necklaces made of seashells Marie Claire, June 1937


Flat shoes and a bag big enough for dance shoes and said shawl. Marie Claire, June 1937


Striped things. I love this long skirt to wear over shorts - who would have thought this was 1937 in France? But this was all inspiration though, not actual reality. The French ideas were often picked up and made overseas (USA in particular) and this meant Paris kept it's identity as a fashion leader, even if in reality they didn't have the resources to produce them at home. Note the visor! Marie Claire, June 1937


Aren't these wonderful seaside outfits? One with a very long sarong wrap and the other with a button through dress Les Jardin des Modes, June 1936


These ladies have it sorted - big hats, parasol, sleeveless jacket easy light weight jacket and flat shoes
Le Jardin des modes, July 1935


I'll be looking forward to next week when my friends will be posting pics. If you can't wait until then, check out The Dreamstress and her 2014 trip

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